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By Akiko Motoyoshi Sumi

This paintings bargains with "wasf" or description that's one of many salient features of the "qasidah" (classical Arabic poetry) culture. It examines descriptive passages in a particular crew of Arabic "qasidah" from diversified a while, with the motifs of horses, and bees and honey-gathering.

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Extra info for Description in Classical Arabic Poetry: Wasf, Ekphrasis, and Interarts Theory (Brill Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures) (Brill Studies in Middle Eastern Literatures)

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49 39 45 'Alqamah’s overlapping line (l. 35) is not entirely identical with this line: the second half of the first hemistich is fì mustanqa'i l-qà'i là˙iban in this line, while in 'Alqamah it is 'an mustarghabi l-qadri là"i˙an. 46 'Alqamah’s overlapping line (l. 36) is partly different from this line: the entire line is khafàhunna min anfàqihinna ka"annamà khafàhunna wadqun min 'ashiyyin mujallibi in this line, while in 'Alqamah it is khafà l-fa'ra min anfàqihi faka"annamà takhallalahu shu"ùbu ghaythin munaqqibi.

Heffernan, Museum of Words: The Poetics of Ekphrasis from Homer to Ashbery (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1993), 3. Heffernan also states, “Where Krieger defines ekphrasis as an impulse toward illusionistic word-painting, I treat it as a kind of poetry that deliberately foregrounds the difference between verbal and visual representation—and in so doing forestalls or at the very least complicates any illusionistic effect,” 3 n. 191. Motoyoshi/f2/1-17 9/10/03 3:58 PM Page 13  13 and al-Bu˙turì, accord with both Spitzer’s and Heffernan’s definitions.

See also The Portable Faulkner, ed. Malcolm Cowley (New York: Viking Press, 1954), 367–439. 22 Quoted by Ong, 63. Emphasis is mine. 23 See Suzanne Stetkevych, Mute, 35–36. Motoyoshi/f3/18-60 9/10/03 3:59 PM Page 30   30 the tribe named 'Alqamah, in addition to our 'Alqamah, and that the former was called al-Khaßì (the gelded horse/castrated man), while the latter was named al-Fa˙l (the strong, energetic stallion/ virile man). 24 The information of the contrast between al-Fa˙l and al-Khaßì does not draw much attention from the reader, considering its brief appearance at the end.

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