Download Iridium Catalysis by Robert H. Crabtree (auth.), Pher G. Andersson (eds.) PDF

By Robert H. Crabtree (auth.), Pher G. Andersson (eds.)

From the contents: Robert H Crabtree: creation and heritage. - Montserrat Diéguez, Oscar P� mies and Carmen Claver: Iridium-catalysed hydrogenation utilizing phosphorous ligands. - David H. Woodmansee and Andreas Pfaltz: Iridium Catalyzed uneven Hydrogenation of Olefins with Chiral N,P and C,N Ligands. - Ourida Saidi and Jonathan M J Williams: Iridium-catalyzed Hydrogen move Reactions. - John F. Bower and Michael J. Krische: Formation of C-C Bonds through Iridium Catalyzed Hydrogenation and move Hydrogenation. - Jongwook Choi, Alan S. Goldman: Ir-Catalyzed Functionalization of CH Bonds. - Mark P. Pouy and John F. Hartwig: Iridium-Catalyzed Allylic Substitution. - Daniel Carmona and Luis A. Oro: Iridium-catalyzed 1.3-dipolar cycloadditions.

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2 Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Furans and Chromenes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Enamines and Indoles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Quinolines and Pyridines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 7 Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Imines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

74 1 Introduction The development of highly enantioselective rhodium–diphosphine catalysts in the early 1970s marked the beginning of a new era in asymmetric synthesis. For the first time, practically useful enantioselectivities could be obtained with synthetic chiral catalysts. The well-known L-Dopa process developed by Monsanto at that time [1] demonstrated that these catalysts can be applied on an industrial scale, and since then, hydrogenation has played a dominant role in industrial asymmetric catalysis [2].

56 5 Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Tetrasubstituted Olefins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 6 Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Trisubstituted Olefins with Heteroatoms . . . . . . . . . 1 Enol Esters and Ethers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Furans and Chromenes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Enamines and Indoles .

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