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Content material: Lindman, B. and Wennerström, H. Micelles. Amphiphile aggression in aqueous resolution. -- Eicke, H.-F. Surfactants in nonpolar solvents. Aggregation and micellization

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Micelles

Content material: Lindman, B. and Wennerström, H. Micelles. Amphiphile aggression in aqueous answer. -- Eicke, H. -F. Surfactants in nonpolar solvents. Aggregation and micellization

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In this scheme one directly accounts for the fact that the magnitude of tZ0HFis smaller for branched than for normal alkanes. Another suggestion is 12s) that it is the number of hydrogens in the apolar part that determines/aOF. The virtue o f this approach is that one correctly describes the difference in/a~ between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbon chains. 14) A characteristic feature of the hydrophobic interaction is that it is dominated by entropy effects. Both the temperature dependence o f alkane solubilities in water ~26,127) and direct calorimetric measurements 128) show that h ~ is close to zero at room temperature.

In this scheme one directly accounts for the fact that the magnitude of tZ0HFis smaller for branched than for normal alkanes. Another suggestion is 12s) that it is the number of hydrogens in the apolar part that determines/aOF. The virtue o f this approach is that one correctly describes the difference in/a~ between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbon chains. 14) A characteristic feature of the hydrophobic interaction is that it is dominated by entropy effects. Both the temperature dependence o f alkane solubilities in water ~26,127) and direct calorimetric measurements 128) show that h ~ is close to zero at room temperature.

The solubilization capacity is generally much bigger for nonionic systems than for ionic ones; this is exemplified by benzene solubilization 16) in Fig. 21. A striking feature of nonionic systems is the clouding phenomenon. When the temperature of a micellar solution is raised the turbidity suddenly (at the cloud point) increases and at still higher temperatures a phase separation occurs. Concomitantly, the intrinsic viscosity shows a dramatic increase 96). Most interesting is the observation that while the growth in size of micelles of ionic surfactants is accompanied by large rises in the ~H NMR line width, no line width increases are observed in the region of the cloud point for nonionic surfactants 97).

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